book a table

Terms & Conditions

Whilst we do accept the Age Good Food gift cards, we do have a limit of 1 gift card per booking.

For bookings of more than 6 guests,
please phone or email the restaurant directly.
Phone: +61 (3) 8663 0500
Email: sales@cecconis.com

TRADING HOURS

Monday – Friday: Breakfast, Lunch & dinner

Saturdays: Dinner only

First sitting:- 5.30pm, 6pm, 6.30pm: these tables must vacate by 8.15pm

Second sitting:- 8.30pm onwards.

Sundays

Exclusive Functions Only
10% Surcharge applies for all Sundays and Public Holidays

ONLINE BOOKINGS

Online reservations are for the main dining room only not the cellar bar.

Reservations for the cellar bar must be made over the phone.
If the time slot you require is unavailable online, please call or email the restaurant directly and we will endeavour to accommodate you.

Please notify us of any special requests:

dietary restrictions
special occasions
cake orders requests

Valentines Day at Cecconi’s

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[booking]

Enjoy Valentine’s Day this year at Cecconi’s Flinders Lane. Connect the dots this Valentine’s to someone special Valentine’s Day Melbourne 2017.

Melbourne is such a great place to be on Valentine’s day and what better way to show the person you love, than a special outing at Cecconi’s Flinders Lane.

To book your table call the restaurant now on 03 8663 0500

Valentine's Day Melbourne 2017

Valentine’s Day Melbourne 2017 at Cecconi’s

Here is a brief history:

The history of Valentine’s Day–and the story of its patron saint–is shrouded in mystery. We do know that February has long been celebrated as a month of romance, and that St. Valentine’s Day, as we know it today, contains vestiges of both Christian and ancient Roman tradition. But who was Saint Valentine, and how did he become associated with this ancient rite?

While some believe that the day is celebrated in the middle of February to commemorate the anniversary of Valentine’s death or burial–which probably occurred around A.D. 270–others claim that the Christian church may have decided to place St. Valentine’s feast day in the middle of February in an effort to “Christianize” the pagan celebration of Lupercalia. Celebrated at the ides of February, or February 15, Lupercalia was a fertility festival dedicated to Faunus, the Roman god of agriculture, as well as to the Roman founders Romulus and Remus.